Patio Filipino: A cozy, delicious spot

Patio Filipino, at 1770 El Camino Real, San Bruno, California, is home to Filipino dining favorites and more. (Photo by Christian Thomas)
Patio Filipino, at 1770 El Camino Real, San Bruno, California, is home to Filipino dining favorites and more. (Photo by Christian Thomas)

By Lorenzo Paran III

We don’t always get to go to a Filipino restaurant these days, so when we do we make it count, and if we happen to be in the San Bruno area our choice is always Patio Filipino.

The restaurant, located along El Camino Real, has been for a while now a popular dining destination for many Pinoys in the area. In fact, when we were there on Sunday (March 7, 2015) we learned from its ever-personable co-owner and manager Tito Gonzales that in May it will celebrate its 10th anniversary. Continue reading Patio Filipino: A cozy, delicious spot

Bikol-Batangas blend

CoffeeNothing brings me back to my childhood in Bikol like a nice cup of steaming hot coffee.

It’s true: My family, by which I mean my extended family on my father’s side—my parents, siblings, grandparents, uncles, aunts and cousins, all of whom I grew up with—all loved a cup of good coffee. My grandfather, most of all.

He was born and raised in Lipa, Batangas, and almost always had only coffee made from beans that came straight from his home province, known in those days, and maybe even up to now, as the “Coffee Capital of the Philippines.” Yearly, until he was too weak to travel the bumpy “South Road,” which was what we called the national highway, to Batangas, he visited his relatives in Lipa and always came back with a small sack or two of the beans that turned into the coffee he drank in Legazpi, where he lived and worked until the day he died. Continue reading Bikol-Batangas blend

In America, a glimpse of the home shore

Mount Mayon, an active volcano in Albay, Philippines, got its name from “daragang magayon” or “beautiful maiden,” the unnamed central character in the main legend of Albay province.
Mount Mayon, an active volcano in Albay, Philippines, got its name from “daragang magayon” or “beautiful maiden,” the central character in the main legend of Albay province. (Photo by Miguel Lorenzo Roxas)

One disadvantage of coming over as an adult to live in the U.S. is that it makes adjusting to a different culture just a tad difficult. When you grow up to be a certain age, you get used to doing certain things and dealing with certain people in a certain way. Moving to live in a different country throws everything off. That is why migrating (whether it’s to the U.S. or elsewhere) is not for everyone. It takes a particular breed of people to thrive in new surroundings.

One advantage of coming over as an adult to live in the U.S. is that you don’t miss the Philippines too much. When you grow up to be a certain age, you feel as if you have seen the Philippines. This is how I feel. I came here when I was in my early 30s, and by that time I had done much traveling in the Philippines—though, truthfully, not enough. But the thing is, when it comes to traveling—whether it’s in a different country or the homeland—it’s never enough. I doubt if anyone can visit all the places worth seeing in any one country. Well, maybe if you did that full time, you can—but, tell me, who can afford to do that? Even hosts of travel shows on TV must move on. Continue reading In America, a glimpse of the home shore